Tattoon Master OVA DVDRip

815full-tattoon-master-posterToon…Tattoon… That was fun. Here we have a short ova series about sudden girl appearance 🙂 Don’t miss this oldschool anime from 90-s with great art style. Video is 706×480(4:3) resolution encoded by x264 in 10bit profile with CRF=16. PP this time is raibowing and dot crawl removal, dehalo, light AA, very light denoise/degrain and deband. Audio track is Japanese stereo AC3 tracks in 48kHz 192kbps. English stereo AC3 tracks in 48kHz 192kbps. Chapters included

R1 source is serviceable. It have lots of interlaced and blended stuff, but mode 2 on AnimeIVTC shows decent deinterlacing quality. Original DVD resolution maintained due to low overall DVD detalization.

Here  screenshot comparison with DVD. We have all time constant 23.976fps that plays smoothly on true cinema tv.

English subs I took from [AniMecha] release. External russian subs by Каlle.

Download it.

7 thoughts on “Tattoon Master OVA DVDRip

  1. Why wouldn’t you just add dual tracks to the video rather than coupling them in the folder? Same with the subtitles. Why not add multiple tracks? Why couldn’t you use the DVD subtitles? Is the source a Japanese release or an English release? Your screenshot comparison is two different images. How can we compare? Yes the TV plays 23.9 Fps but the video is more like 12 Fps. 4:3 aspect ratio is 640×480 for a 480p video. Why is the video height stretched from 640 to 706? The average leecher doesn’t know what R1 source is and frankly; neither do I. I may not be very adept at encoding but I downloaded your content and reworked it for nyaa.si under the username “Teonanacatl”. Check it out and get back to me.

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    • English dub is external because a lot of downloaders don’t need it at all, so they saving some space. DVD subtitles are much worse than ass soft subs due to lack of style support and fixed resolution. Screenshot comparison have 4 images of 2 frames – when you move mouse over image it shows my encode (when out – DVD source). Original DVD resolution is NTSC 720×480, it is cropped to 706 due to black bars by sides(it’s anamorphic video when SAR and DAR is different see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pixel_aspect_ratio ).

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      • What do you mean downloaders don’t need it? 99% of anime is primarily marketed to both English and Japanese speaking people… Even if downloaders didn’t “need it” you’re not really saving any space if you’re still coupling the audio tracks in the folder. Compare our file sizes on .nyaa and you will see that you’re only saving a third of a MB which is practically inconsequential.

        That doesn’t explain why you sought out subtitles from a third party. It’s not that difficult to rework and/or convert subtitles. Who worked these subtitles? What assurances do we have that they are accurate? At least the subtitles that came with the media can be trusted. It’s not that difficult to extract the text and the time codes to map them onto an ASS format when one has the source as a reference.

        If it’s 720×480 then the ratio is a cropped 3:2 then… not 4:3. I’m not an expert but I feel like there’s a better way to translate the data rather than resorting to cropping the frame height.

        Look at how well my upload did in the short amount of time that it’s been active. The numbers don’t lie. If you do the math I will have more completed downloads in the next few days than you have had in the last four months at this rate. I’m not trying to insult you and I think we both have something to offer one another perspective-wise. You have technical skills and equipment and I have networking and marketing skills.

        This is an anime I truly cherish as you may notice. I would just like to see it have the justice it deserves.

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  2. “[mottoj] Tattoon Master OVA (DVDRip 706×480 x264 Hi10p AC3 Chap)”

    You know this isn’t even labeled very well. If it has a Japanese audio track and the video source is Japanese then it would help Japanese people to have the Japanese title included. There’s no reason to add “OVA” to the file/folder name since the OVA is the only video release of this title. There is no other Tattoon Master video release. “Hi10p” and “Chap” seems like irrelevant information for a downloader. What is “Chap” even referring to? Actually all of this information is irrelevant for the file/folder name except for “Tattoon Master”. All of the specifications could be added to the tags or to a .nfo included in the folder and some of it is automatically included in the tags. The name or title is just that, the name or title, and more importantly than the media specifications or the codec is the video/audio/subtitle language. You don’t really know what you’re downloading until you are already downloading it. What I’m looking for is a copy of the DVD with everything the DVD includes not a reworked version of it with an inadequate label. I have to thank you for this release as there is hardly any in existence on the internet but I have allot of questions and concerns as you can probably tell.

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    • OVA is added for search reasons. “Hi10p” added to warn user about 10-bit x264 encoding in this release, which may be incompatible with a lot of video players. “Chap” means that this release have chapter information in video files. All this naming is unwritten standard for labelling releases from old times.

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      • I contend that there are so few copies of this title on the web that adding OVA into the title is redundant. Your copy (and now mine) are really the only two functionally competing uploads that I am aware of as far as torrents go. The only video release of this title is the OVA. “Tattoon Master” by itself is enough to yield results for anyone searching for the English title which brings me back to my previous point. If someone is searching for the English title why would they not want the English audio dialogue? If you’re not sure people would have compatible media players for Hi10p then what good would separated audio tracks do for them? Why even add them at all under this assumption and since you’ve expressed the concern of limiting file sizes. It just doesn’t make sense.

        As far as compatible video players go; that’s an issue for the consumer not the provider in this case. Anyone who is capable of torrenting such media shouldn’t have a problem playing it. VLC Media Player is quite well known. It would seem wiser to add full disclosure in the description or like I said; in a .nfo or various other informational document coupled with the media if you have legitimate concerns. Only an encoder of media would understand what “Hi10p” entails and if they can rip media then they aren’t usually the ones downloading.

        Adding “Chap” is contradictory to your previous assertion as well. Not all media players incorporate chapter functionality into their interfaces. You assume that people wouldn’t be able to play the media due to incompatibility but at the same time you assume that the compatibility is there for chapters to be pertinent to them. The logic isn’t sound.

        As I tried to explain before; a title is a title, not a tag, not a description, not metadata, or source information. Just because everyone does it doesn’t mean that it’s correct. In my experience; it’s less likely to be correct if everyone is doing it. When I’m looking for a specific anime title the name is obviously of primary importance. If I were Japanese searching for this title and I did not see “ト ゥ ー ン · マ ス タ ー” or “Tatūn Masutā” in the name/title then I may miss the upload all-together or at the very least it would make searching for the title that much more difficult.

        The codec, the metadata, the encoded specifications, subs, dubs, encoders, etc is all stuff I look for afterward within the upload description, the batch files, or the media itself. There are still some important pieces of information you left out if you’re going to be a stickler for specificity such as; the origin of the hard copy media and/or the origin of the elements incorporated into the media. Simply adding “AniMecha”, “Japanese Dubbed”, English Subbed”, etc doesn’t reveal the origin of the media and/or its elements. I would like to know which regional version the hard copy media was actually taken from and if elements were taken from third parties I would like to know who acquired and/or composed them, what reference(s) they used, and how they were composed. How do I know it’s not fandub or fansub? How do I know the elements are or are not the licensed and original elements incorporated into the media by the regional production companies?

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  3. //
    To Aaron Weeks

    “What do you mean downloaders don’t need it? 99% of anime is primarily marketed to both English and Japanese speaking people…” I prefer original Japanese audio since any dub on any language is no use for me and for Many other users. Did you notice, that I always add Russian subtitles for releases? Well it’s obvious reason not importing English dub for users from my country 🙂

    “That doesn’t explain why you sought out subtitles from a third party.” Subs was chosen due to quality styling and downloaded from reliable source (Baka-BT), which collects most quality releases. I’m not intended to rework DVD subtitles anyhow. It’s a last option for me to add DVD subs if there are no styled subs available (in 90% cases styled subs based on DVD subs).

    “If you’re not sure people would have compatible media players for Hi10p then what good would separated audio tracks do for them? “ “As far as compatible video players go; that’s an issue for the consumer not the provider in this case. Anyone who is capable of torrenting such media shouldn’t have a problem playing it. VLC Media Player is quite well known. It would seem wiser to add full disclosure in the description or like I said; in a .nfo or various other informational document coupled with the media if you have legitimate concerns. Only an encoder of media would understand what “Hi10p” entails and if they can rip media then they aren’t usually the ones downloading.” Hi10p is still a huge problem for hardware media players and apple/android phones particularly (draw battery), users claim my releases for doing it in 10-bit. For my opinion 10-bit encode should be noted in title. It’s a standard practice on nyaa. Most HW players can play external subs and dubs, but not 10-bit video.

    “Adding “Chap” is contradictory to your previous assertion as well. Not all media players incorporate chapter functionality into their interfaces. You assume that people wouldn’t be able to play the media due to incompatibility but at the same time you assume that the compatibility is there for chapters to be pertinent to them. The logic isn’t sound.” Chapter information help users to pick up better release. I’m not only one who add this tag in torrent name. And I don’t like releases without chapters much.

    “When I’m looking for a specific anime title the name is obviously of primary importance. If I were Japanese searching for this title and I did not see “ト ゥ ー ン · マ ス タ ー” or “Tatūn Masutā” in the name/title then I may miss the upload all-together or at the very least it would make searching for the title that much more difficult.“ Japanese people that use nyaa have to deal with its variability in torrent naming, which in most cases is an English title. And I’m naming torrents in a way that I want to see it on a site.

    “I would like to know which regional version the hard copy media was actually taken from and if elements were taken from third parties I would like to know who acquired and/or composed them, what reference(s) they used, and how they were composed. How do I know it’s not fandub or fansub? How do I know the elements are or are not the licensed and original elements incorporated into the media by the regional production companies?” Regional version is available in description, for most cases there is only one version of R1DVD. Fandub is not an option at all for my releases. Subtitle information always present in torrent description.

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